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Can England win the Rugby World Cup?

Stuart Lancaster’s side were bitterly disappointed to finish runners up to Ireland in the Six Nations earlier this year, but England remain positive of their chances ahead of the upcoming Rugby World Cup. In the spring, Lancaster was forced to select a weakened side as the likes of Owen Farrell, Courtney Lawes and David Wilson were all ruled out prior to the start of the tournament, while full back Mike Brown suffered a horrific concussion in the victory over Italy that affected the remainder of his tournament. We take a look at the World Cup and discuss England’s chances of lifting the sport’s greatest trophy for the first time since 2003. For more news and odds on the Rugby World Cup, or for other union information, click here.

Home advantage could be key

 

As hosts, England will receive a huge lift in every match they play in the tournament. Despite the best efforts of the WRU, Lancaster’s side will face Warren Gatland’s side at Twickenham rather than the Millennium Stadium – a huge advantage. Meanwhile, opposing sides may be forced to play in imposing stadiums such as Elland Road, St. James’ Park and Stadium MK, while England play all of their Pool A matches at Twickenham.

Manu Tuilagi will be a big loss, and there may be others who also miss out…

 

The Leicester centre has been ruled out of the Rugby World Cup after he was axed for assaulting two female police officers. Tuilagi is one of the most powerful and influential players in the sport and England will certainly miss his versatility on both sides of the ball. With Dylan Hartley also in trouble after a senseless headbutt on Saracens hooker Jamie George, and the arrest of Danny Cipriani on suspicion of drink-driving, England’s discipline is starting to crumble at the worst possible time.

 

On their day, England can beat the world’s best

 

In the last few years, England have struggled against the world’s greatest union sides – particularly those from the southern hemisphere. Although their record isn’t as bad as Wales’ against these sides, they have failed to earn convincing results on a regular basis. However, they have beaten the likes of New Zealand, Australia and South Africa on various occasions throughout the past three years – proving that they can compete with the best teams in the world. If they can improve their consistency, then they will stand a great chance of lifting the trophy on October 31st.

 

Garry loves writing, editing and ranking keywords in the search engines. His passion for basketball, football, baseball and other sports has led him to write. He has been writing and promoting his blogs in the past seven years.

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